Executive Education is booming around the world

he Financial Times has published the annual ranking of the world’s best executive MBA programmes. Top of their list for open classes came the Swiss business school IMD, followed by Booth at the University of Chicago and HEC in France (find the full ranking here http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/executive-education-open-2014).

When it comes to providing custom made programmes for individual corporations, leader of the pack is Duke Corporate Education, followed by HEC and IESE Business School in Spain (find the full ranking here http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/executive-education-customised-2014).

The daily paper comments its analysis: “After seven years of gloom and despondency, the business of executive education short courses, the cash cow of many business schools, is looking buoyant once more”. This is good news after a decade of hungry years in which schools had to lay-off staff. The Said School at the University of Oxford, for example, had to turn down business. And even so, revenues last year have risen from nine million GBP to 15 million GBP.

Smiles everywhere: according to a survey by Booth, growth in executive programmes at 11 top US business schools has risen by almost 5 per cent in the past 5 years. The 10 schools in Latin America had an increase in revenues of more than 17 per cent in 2013, on top of a growth rate of more than 13 per cent in 2012. The same goes for Asia: schools in Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as China report substantial growth rates.http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/35cceda2-cca2-11e3-ab99-00144feabdc0.html#axzz31fKroAH6

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/35cceda2-cca2-11e3-ab99-00144feabdc0.html#axzz31fKroAH6

When it comes to providing custom made programmes for individual corporations, leader of the pack is Duke Corporate Education, followed by HEC and IESE Business School in Spain (find the full ranking here rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/executive-education-customised-2014). The daily paper comments its analysis: “After seven years of gloom and despondency, the business of executive education short courses, the cash cow of many business schools, is looking buoyant once more”. This is good news after a decade of hungry years in which schools had to lay-off staff. The Said School at the University of Oxford, for example, had to turn down business. And even so, revenues last year have risen from nine million GBP to 15 million GBP. Smiles everywhere: according to a survey by Booth, growth in executive programmes at 11 top US business schools has risen by almost 5 per cent in the past 5 years. The 10 schools in Latin America had an increase in revenues of more than 17 per cent in 2013, on top of a growth rate of more than 13 per cent in 2012. The same goes for Asia: schools in Singapore, Japan, Malaysia and Indonesia, as well as China report substantial growth rates. www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/35cceda2-cca2-11e3-ab99-00144feabdc0.html

Barbara Bierach
Picture: Stephanie_Hofschlaeger_/pixelio.de
Picture: Stephanie_Hofschlaeger_/pixelio.de

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